The Role of a Deputy

Damages awards in cerebral palsy cases have to be supervised by a judge to ensure they are in the best interests of an injured person.  But what happens after that?  These are often seven figure sums of money, with additional annual payments, and there is not much scope for making a mistake.

The answer lies in the appointment of a ‘deputy’.

This role effectively means that a deputy steps into the clients shoes, and “becomes” them for all financial purposes.

The deputy will therefore need to:

    1. Work with a client’s family to deal with payment of bills and put in place a structure to meet cash needs can be whilst also protecting the client from their vulnerability in handling cash.
    2. Employ a professional in order to manage the investment of funds and liaise with the client and his family regarding financial and investment decisions, in order to discuss how funds are lasting.
    3. Manage tax.
    4. Working closely with family, dealing with the recruitment, monitoring and payment of carers, or employ and monitor a suitable professional to perform these tasks.
    5. Attend meetings with Court of Protection Visitors, case managers, care workers, social workers and family members regarding the client’s care and wellbeing;
    6. Deal with the purchase and adaptation of a property for the client
    7. Deal with the purchase and adaptation of a vehicle;
    8. Deal with the purchase of other significant items of equipment, like wheelchairs.
    9. Organise repairs and maintenance.
    10. Spend time helping a  client with what they can and can’t do with their money, help them budget and plan financially;
    11. Ensure proper use of state benefits.

It is also possible to be appointed as a deputy in relation to someone’s health and personal welfare issues.  Such a role is more geared towards decision making in relation to where it is in a client’s best interests to live, what care they should receive and also to make decisions regarding their medical treatment.  Usually this is a role for a close family member rather than a professional.

As with all aspects of these complex cases, Express is on hand to guide clients through the appointment of a deputy and beyond.

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